Maningrida – The Place where the dreaming changed shape. Architects Without Frontiers Site Visit.

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Esther Charlesworth, MoDDD Academic Director
Architects without Frontiers (AWF) have been working with the remote Indigenous settlement of Maningrida in Arnhem Land for the last 10 years. Maningrida means “The Place where the dreaming changed shape”.As well as working on design projects for the small township I have also worked with Profs Ralph Horne, Ron Wakefield and John Fien on an ARC Linkage project to improve remote Indigenous housing in Maningrida and other towns in NT and WA.

Continue reading “Maningrida – The Place where the dreaming changed shape. Architects Without Frontiers Site Visit.”

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Refugee Camp in My Neighbourhood

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Rennae Sillett, MoDDD student

The Sydney suburb of Auburn, 19 kilometres west of the CBD, is one of Australia’s most diverse neighbourhoods. It also has a very interesting demographic record. First, it has Sydney’s highest rate of natural population increase – when births outnumber deaths. Second, It is one of the most popular destinations in the city for overseas migrants; and third, within a few years, more people move on from Auburn than just about anywhere else in Sydney.

How do you explain this? Continue reading “Refugee Camp in My Neighbourhood”

International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga – Student Experiences

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Alice Lake-Hammond

I spent most of my time in Chamanga trekking up and down what is now the Camino Principal of Nuevo Chamanga (the main road of New Chamanga). Positioned at the top end of the town I was given a small but fascinating insight into the various ways the community have responded and are still adapting to the situation they now finds  themselves in.

Continue reading “International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga – Student Experiences”

International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga – Student Experiences

sarah-port-site-1Sarah Schoffel 

There is a delicate balance to be maintained between traditional artisanal fishing practiced by a large part of the population of Chamanga, prawn farming and the estuarine mangroves. The mangroves are crucial as they provide nurseries for fish. These photos are in the area where the new fishing port facility is planned. Continue reading “International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga – Student Experiences”

International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga – Student Experiences

raphael-img_5050-2Raphael Kilpatrick

All the theory of development doesn’t equip you for the theory amnesia that strikes in the field. At first it’s the travel peculiarities that distract you from what’s ahead. Looking left instead of right as the Trolebús takes your nose off. A few deep gasps of the high altitude air isn’t quite enough to catch your breath. The beautiful sensory overload keeps you keenly observant but easily distracted from why we are here.

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International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga – Student Experiences

Robin Mansfield

You never really know what you’re capable of until you let go of fear and throw yourself into a life of absurdities. I say absurd, because describing what we are doing here in Ecuador mystifies many, horrifies others, and for a special few, well, they sit undecided between looking longingly at the ocean and hurling themselves headlong in, regardless of the water temperature.

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International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga

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UIC, UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO, RMIT, Universidad Católica de Ecuador (PUCE), UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Background

On April 16th 2016, a 7,8 degree Richter scale earthquake took place in Ecuador. It affected the populations along the coast, one of which was the Parroquia of San José de Chamanga. Sixty to seventy percent of the houses collapsed, leaving the coast line as ground zero.

Continue reading “International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga”